Appalachian Trail Histories

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Description:

In 1938, the National Park Service published guidelines on the proper types of structures that should be built in the national parks. This booklet, authored by the architect Albert Good, was used by leaders of the Civilian Conservation Corps as guidance for the trail shelters they built along the Appalachian Trail during the 1930s. The description of the lean-to design reads, in part:

In New York State the Adirondack shelter is a tradition, a survival of the primitive shelter of the earliest woodsmen and hunters of this region. The end and rear walls are tightly built of logs, the front is open to the friendly warmth and light of the campfire. The roof slopes gently to the rear and sharply to the front to give a protective overhang.

The Adirondack shelter design was also used by the Appalachian Trail Conference in its guidance to member clubs in 1939 about the shelters they were building in the stretches of of the Trail they were responsible for.

Collection:

Trail Shelters


Date:

1938

Creator:

National Park Service

Subject

Trail Shelters

Contributor

Mills Kelly

Format

Text

Source:

Hathi Trust

Rights

No known copyright

Citation

National Park Service, “Trailside Seats, Shelters, and Overlooks,” Appalachian Trail Histories, accessed September 20, 2019, http://appalachiantrailhistory.org/items/show/451.

Geolocation

CCC Shelters.jpg
CCC Shelters2.jpg