Appalachian Trail Histories

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The Brown Mountain Creek Shelter is located in the George Washington National Forest in Central Virginia and is a typical example of the shelters built by the U.S. Forest Service. It is a plank sided lean-to built just above a small stream. This shelter is maintained by the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club.

The Brown Mountain Creek community that existed here before the National Forest and the Appalachian Trail was made up of the descendants of freed slaves who created a small but thriving community in and around the stream that gives the hollow its name. An oral history with a former resident of the community is available here.

Collection: Trail Shelters
Brown Mountain Creek 2018.jpg

The Seeley-Woodworth Shelter, built in 1984 by volunteers from the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club, is named in honor of two long-time NBATC members -- Harold Seeley and Jack Woodworth. This shelter is a typical example of the USFS plank sided shelter design and its construction was part of a relocation of several shelters in this section of the Trail, either to eliminate shelters too close to roads, or to remove others from wilderness areas. The Seeley-Woodworth Shelter is maintained by the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club.

Collection: Trail Shelters
Seely Woodworth 2018.jpg

The Punch Bowl Shelter is located in the Jefferson National Forest (VA) between the James and Tye Rivers. It was built by the U.S. Forest Service in the early 1960s and is maintained by the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club.

Collection: Trail Shelters
Punchbowl Shelter 05251974.jpg

The Thunder Hill Shelter is located on northern slope of Apple Orchard Mountain in the Jefferson National Forest (Virginia). Built in the 1960s by the U.S. Forest Service, this shelter is of the later Forest Service structures that were plank and post construction rather than being built from logs. This shelter is maintained by the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club.

Collection: Trail Shelters
Thunder Hill 07232016MK.jpg

The Thunder Hill Shelter is located on northern slope of Apple Orchard Mountain in the Jefferson National Forest (Virginia). Built in the 1960s by the U.S. Forest Service, this shelter is of the later Forest Service structures that were plank and post construction rather than being built from logs. This shelter is maintained by the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club

Collection: Trail Shelters
Thunder Ridge Shelter 05201974.jpg

The Matts Creek Shelter is located in the James River Face Wilderness Area of the Jefferson National Forest in Virginia. It is the first shelter south of the James River and is a typical example of the plank sided lean-tos found along the Trail in U.S. Forest Service lands. This shelter is maintained by the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club.

Collection: Trail Shelters
Matts Creek 06122017MK.jpg

The Johns Hollow Shelter is the first shelter northbound hikers encounter after crossing the James River footbridge. Built in the standard U.S. Forest Service style in the 1960s, this shelter is maintained by the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club.

Collection: Trail Shelters
John's Hollow Shelter

Members of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC), Roanoke Appalachian Trail Club (RATC), and the Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club (NBATC) on a group hike to McAfee Knob, October 1935.

Collection: Iconic Locations
McAfee 1935.jpg

Bobblet's Gap Shelter, July 21, 2016. A typical light wood frame shelter was built by the U.S. Forest Service in 1961 and is named for a local farmer (Will Bobblet) who used to live nearby.

Collection: Trail Shelters
Bobblet's Gap 2016.jpg