Appalachian Trail Histories

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In 1930, the Carolina Appalachian Trail Club  was organized for the purpose of completing the western North Carolina segment of the Appalachian Trail. Its home was in Asheville. In 1931, the group merged with the Carolina Mountain Club, an organization founded in 1923 and still active today. This map of the Appalachian Trail and the North Carolina section of the Great Smoky Mountains was created that same year. The map was one of many collected by Horace Kephart (1862-1931).

Collection: Maps
Appalachian_Trail_in_North_Carolina (1).jpg

This map of a proposed Appalachian Trail appeared in Benton MacKaye's essay, "An Appalachian Trail: A Project in Regional Planning," Journal of the American Institute of Architects, 9 (October 1921): 325-30. It shows the original route he had in mind for the Trail as well as a variety of connecting trails that either existed or were already in the planning or construction stages.

Collection: Maps
MacKaye-Map.jpg

This is the pamphlet that is handed out to guests who vacation to Shenandoah National Park. The lodge is located approximately halfway down the 104-mile-long Skyline Drive, and is the highest point of the highway. This map depicts the numerous cabins that make up the lodge, as well as shows where the Appalachian Trail crosses over and passes by Skyline Drive.

Skyland brochure.pdf

This 1938 map of the Appalachian Trail from the Susquehanna River to the Virginia/Tennessee border, appeared on the back of the stationary of the Appalachian Trail Conference beginning in the late 1930s. It describes those portions of the Trail covered by the PATC's Guide to Paths in the Blue Ridge: Measured Distances and Detailed Directions for 506 Miles of the Appalachian Trail and 65 Miles of Side Trails in Virginia and Adjacent States, originally published in 1931 and reprinted numerous times since. The route of the Trail in 1938, especially in southern Virginia, is quite different from the current route.

Collection: Maps
PATCMap1938.jpg

Image from page 6 of "The Appalachian Trail", published by the U.S. Forest Service in 1964.

19749743271_944fdb2eee_o.jpg

Map of the proposed Appalachian Trail, hand-drawn by Benton MacKaye for the first meeting of the Appalachian Trail Conference, March, 1925. Although this map became the blueprint for the Trail, the final terminus for the path ended up being Springer Mountain, not the Cohutta Mountains of North Georgia as he proposed in this map.

Collection: Maps
MacKaye Map 1925.jpg

Map from the Confederate Engineer Bureau in Richmond, Va. General J.F. Gilmer Chief Engineer . Presented to the West Point Military Academy by his only daughter, Mrs J.F. Minis, Savh, Ga

Nethers Area Map.jpg