Appalachian Trail Histories

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Photograph of Corbin Cabin, photographer unknown, but likely Ed Garvey. This photograph was taken before the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC) took control of the cabin from the National Park Service and renovated it for use by hikers in 1954.

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Photograph of Corbin Cabin, undated, but between the mid-1930s when George Corbin was forced to move out by the Commonwealth of Virginia and 1954 when the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club renovated the cabin.

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A humorous and artistic account of the "Battle of Corbin Cabin" by anonymous renters in the summer of 2014.
Hikers staying at the shelters and cabins along the Appalachian Trail use the log books to let the world know they were there, to comment on the state of their feet, the weather, the wildlife they've seen recently, on "trail magic" to be found up or down the trail, on creepy or just worrisome people seen along the trail, on the condition of the shelter or cabin, or to leave messages for friends and family. This particularly fanciful entry in the log book at Corbin Cabin, complete with blood stains, is an example of one of the more exceptional genres of log book entries--the fictional (we hope) illustrated story.

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Photograph of Corbin Cabin, undated, but between the mid-1930s when George Corbin was forced to move out by the Commonwealth of Virginia and 1954 when the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club renovated the cabin.

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Image of George T. Corbin taken in 1954 during the reopening of his cabin in Shenandoah National Park following a renovation by members of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC). Corbin attending the event and told visitors about what it was like to build the cabin and to live there.

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Image of George T. Corbin taken in 1954 during the reopening of his cabin in Shenandoah National Park following a renovation by members of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC). Corbin attending the event and told visitors about what it was like to build the cabin and to live there.

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Be loyal. Drink good beer. Love all who love and support you. Give no shit. Take no shit. Stand up for someone weak. Give back. Don't steal. Don't lie. Don't cheat. Protect something til death. Fuck hard. Love harder...Take care of your people...Be part of something bigger than yourself. Learn how to listen to shoot. Listen to good music often. Eat well. Love all animals. Crush anyone who harms women, the disabled, or children. Be the example. Live it.
-- Stayed the night, a little late but good job all.
-- Thru-hiker NoBo on 900 miles. Keep on trucking ladies & gents.
Mau & Dirt Time
[website: http://karellahikeat.org]


Collection: Hikers
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Photograph of Russ Nicholson, taken by Arthur Rothstein in October 1935. Nicholson was a resident of upper Nicholson Hollow in what is now Shenandoah National Park (Virginia). This photograph was taken before Nicholson and all the other residents of Nicholson Hollow were forced to move from their homes to make way for the Park.

The photograph is one of many created by Rothstein during his visit to Virginia in 1935 while employed by the U.S. Farm Security Administration.

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One of the Corbin boys, Corbin Hollow, Virginia. A photograph taken by Arthur Rothstein in October 1935 for the Farm Security Administration.

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Photograph of a barn and a woodshed in Corbin Hollow, taken by Arthur Rothstein in October 1935.

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Photograph of Corbin Cabin, March 2013

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Photograph of a child in Corbin Hollow (1935) made by Arthur Rothstein.

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