Appalachian Trail Histories

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A undated photograph of Nicholson Hollow resident Fannie Corbin and one of her children. On the reverse of the print it says "Fannie Corbin and one of her 22 children." Fannie Corbin was a resident of Lower Nicholson Hollow in what is now Shenandoah National Park. This photograph, although undated, was almost certainly taken before the people of Nicholson Hollow were required to move by the Commonwealth of Virginia to make way for the new park in 1936.

Collection: Nicholson Hollow
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This photograph (photographer unknown) depicts Sam Corbin and Eddie Nicholson, residents of Corbin Hollow, Virginia at the time that Shenandoah National Park was being created. According to information on the reverse of the photograph, Sam Corbin is on the left, Eddie Nicholson is on the right. The children are not named.

Collection: Corbin Hollow
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This photograph was likely taken in Corbin Hollow, Virginia, in 1930 (photographer unknown), along what is now the called the Corbin Mountain Trail. On the reverse of the print in the archives of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC), it says "The Newt and Andrew Nicholson. 1930". Although there is no further information, the photograph likely shows three generations of Nicholsons. "The Newt" is Newton Nicholson (the older man) depicted here. Andrew Nicholson's home was located in Corbin Hollow, while Newton Nicholson's was on the northwest slope of Short Mountain, about two miles to the north of Corbin Hollow along what is now called the Hannah Run Trail. It is possible this photograph was taken there rather than in Corbin Hollow.

Collection: Corbin Hollow
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This photograph, likely taken by Ed Garvey of the Potomac Appalachian Trial Club (PATC), shows Corbin Cabin between the time that George Corbin was forced to leave his home and the renovation of the cabin by PATC members in 1953-54.

Collection: Nicholson Hollow
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This photograph shows Corbin Cabin under renovation in the spring of 1954. The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC) took over control and maintenance of the cabin from Shenandoah National Park in 1953 and over the course of a year renovated the structure and turned it into a rental property for Club members and guests.
In this photograph one can see the work going on the repair and restore the bunk room on the side of the cabin.

Collection: Nicholson Hollow
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Photograph of Corbin Cabin, photographer unknown, but likely Ed Garvey. This photograph was taken before the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC) took control of the cabin from the National Park Service and renovated it for use by hikers in 1954.

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Photograph of Corbin Cabin, undated, but between the mid-1930s when George Corbin was forced to move out by the Commonwealth of Virginia and 1954 when the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club renovated the cabin.

Collection: Nicholson Hollow
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A humorous and artistic account of the "Battle of Corbin Cabin" by anonymous renters in the summer of 2014.
Hikers staying at the shelters and cabins along the Appalachian Trail use the log books to let the world know they were there, to comment on the state of their feet, the weather, the wildlife they've seen recently, on "trail magic" to be found up or down the trail, on creepy or just worrisome people seen along the trail, on the condition of the shelter or cabin, or to leave messages for friends and family. This particularly fanciful entry in the log book at Corbin Cabin, complete with blood stains, is an example of one of the more exceptional genres of log book entries--the fictional (we hope) illustrated story.

Collection: Nicholson Hollow
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Photograph of Corbin Cabin, undated, but between the mid-1930s when George Corbin was forced to move out by the Commonwealth of Virginia and 1954 when the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club renovated the cabin.

Collection: Nicholson Hollow
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Image of George T. Corbin taken in 1954 during the reopening of his cabin in Shenandoah National Park following a renovation by members of the Potomac Appalachian Trail Club (PATC). Corbin attending the event and told visitors about what it was like to build the cabin and to live there.

Collection: Nicholson Hollow
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